libraryjournal:

From GalleyCat:

BBC One and BBC Drama have teamed up to create a television adaptation of The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling. The series should be released in 2014.

I wonder if they’ll film the dirty parts?

Read my and Sarah Braud’s epistolary review of Rowling’s book at Hunger Mountain here, including obligatory mentions of “the dirty parts.”

libraryjournal:

From GalleyCat:

BBC One and BBC Drama have teamed up to create a television adaptation of The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling. The series should be released in 2014.

I wonder if they’ll film the dirty parts?

Read my and Sarah Braud’s epistolary review of Rowling’s book at Hunger Mountain here, including obligatory mentions of “the dirty parts.”

What VCFA Taught Us

So I’m a little bit in love with my school. It’s a good thing such a lighting bolt of matriculation-inspired love hit me a bit later in life, because all the deep, complex ambivalence I’ve felt towards every other educational institution attended is much better writing fodder. All this mushy “alma mater nurtured me” stuff is dull—but nurturing. Very nurturing.

Anyway, I’ve been reading tons of VCFA blogs for my fellowship, and I wanted to highlight a few of my classmates and others who have been writing down what they’ve learned at the last residency. If you write, or are interested in the critique and craft of literary writing (fiction or non-), these should all be of interest…

  • Emily Casey and Sarah Braud, two of my constant campus companions, both write about Richard McCann’s work from different angles—but with Richard, it’s always about transmuting your personal pain onto the page.  McCann is one of the newest and most beloved faculty members up at VCFA (kind of a local demigod) who espouses a “writing from life” philosophy and spurns genre distinctions. 
  • Sarah also has summaries of some of the lectures from residency, including Ellen Lesser, my current advisor, on the “end-times” mentality in contemporary stories dealing with disasters like Katrina and global warming. Hint: Biblical language is crucial. Redemption is hard to find.
  • Rich Farrell has a great post at Numero Cinq (which is faculty member Douglas Glover’s blog) about “Crowd Control” or how to handle multiple characters in a piece of short fiction.