(via Jane Austen meets mansplaining: This is the perfect satire of the anti-feminism movement - Salon.com)
I wrote about Jane Austen, manfeels-park, and feminism for Salon.
"The Memory Garden is the tale of Nan, an amateur witch who has helped women “in trouble” in the past — we all know what that means — and of her foundling child Bey, who may have nascent supernatural abilities. Nan harbors a particularly dark secret from her girlhood, a loss which led to her choice of profession. On a weekend reunion with Nan’s childhood friends, in which they gather for a “flower feast” — literally, a feast based around floral ingredients and flavors — and exchange reminiscences that turn into accusations, the truth emerges. The novel’s plot is formed into what Rickert describes as a “spiral” structure, slowly unfurling itself. Oh, and there are ghosts around Nan’s house, who pop in and out to aid the unfurling."

Memory Garden Author Mary Rickert Interview – Flavorwire

So pleased to find a home for this Q+A with Mary, an amazing writer and person!

(via Taking a Bite Out of Networking Events: A Guide for Beginners | The Hairpin)
Ask yourself two questions: The first is whom do I know here, and the second is where is the cheese table? Good. Now combine these two questions: whom do I know here who is closest to the cheese table?

(via Taking a Bite Out of Networking Events: A Guide for Beginners | The Hairpin)

Ask yourself two questions: The first is whom do I know here, and the second is where is the cheese table? Good. Now combine these two questions: whom do I know here who is closest to the cheese table?

(via I Read And Love Both Bridget Jones’s Diary And Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying — So What? | xoJane) My defense of pleasure reading, which is basically the m.o. of my previous blog, The Egalitarian Bookworm.

(via I Read And Love Both Bridget Jones’s Diary And Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying — So What? | xoJane)
My defense of pleasure reading, which is basically the m.o. of my previous blog, The Egalitarian Bookworm.

"When she saw the photographer again this week it would be all business. She longed to see him anyway."

The understandable pangs of a frustrated housewife in my bittersweet and satirical short story.

Sarah Seltzer: “After the Bar Mitzvah” from Joy Somewhere in the City, a Novel in Stories | WIPs

"So now Ilana was like the Jews in the desert. Free, yes, but wandering, thirsty, blistered. Worse, she had no clue where the promised land lay, if it existed."

In the Desert | Lilith Magazine
Lilith has posted the full text of my short story!